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Big Data Analytic

Big data analytics is the process of examining large data sets containing a variety of data types -- i.e., big data -- to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations, market trends, customer preferences and other useful business information. The analytical findings can lead to more effective marketing, new revenue opportunities, better customer service, improved operational efficiency, competitive advantages over rival organizations and other business benefits.

The primary goal of big data analytics is to help companies make more informed business decisions by enabling data scientists, predictive modelers and other analytics professionals to analyze large volumes of transaction data, as well as other forms of data that may be untapped by conventional business intelligence (BI) programs. That could include Web server logs and Internet clickstream data, social media content and social network activity reports, text from customer emails and survey responses, mobile-phone call detail records and machine data captured by sensors connected to the Internet of Things. Some people exclusively associate big data with semi-structured and unstructured data of that sort, but consulting firms like Gartner Inc. and Forrester Research Inc. also consider transactions and other structured data to be valid components of big data analytics applications.

Big data can be analyzed with the software tools commonly used as part of advanced analytics disciplines such as predictive analytics, data mining, text analytics and statistical analysis. Mainstream BI software and data visualization tools can also play a role in the analysis process. But the semi-structured and unstructured data may not fit well in traditional data warehouses based on relational databases. Furthermore, data warehouses may not be able to handle the processing demands posed by sets of big data that need to be updated frequently or even continually -- for example, real-time data on the performance of mobile applications or of oil and gas pipelines. As a result, many organizations looking to collect, process and analyze big data have turned to a newer class of technologies that includes Hadoop and related tools such as YARN, MapReduce, Spark, Hive and Pig as well as NoSQL databases. Those technologies form the core of an open source software framework that supports the processing of large and diverse data sets across clustered systems.

Why is big data analytics important?
For years customers have evolved their analytics methods from a reactive view into a proactive approach using predictive and prescriptive analytics. Both reactive and proactive approaches are used by organizations, but let's look closely at what is best for your organization and task at hand.

There are four approaches to analytics, and each falls within the reactive or proactive category:

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    1. Reactive – business intelligence. In the reactive category, business intelligence (BI) provides standard business reports, ad hoc reports, OLAP and even alerts and notifications based on analytics. This ad hoc analysis looks at the static past, which has its purpose in a limited number of situations.
    2. Reactive – big data BI. When reporting pulls from huge data sets, we can say this is performing big data BI. But decisions based on these two methods are still reactionary.
    3. Proactive – big analytics. Making forward-looking, proactive decisions requires proactive big analytics like optimization, predictive modeling, text mining, forecasting and statistical analysis. They allow you to identify trends, spot weaknesses or determine conditions for making decisions about the future. But although it's proactive, big analytics cannot be performed on big data because traditional storage environments and processing times cannot keep up.
    4. Proactive – big data analytics. By using big data analytics you can extract only the relevant information from terabytes, petabytes and exabytes, and analyze it to transform your business decisions for the future. Becoming proactive with big data analytics isn't a one-time endeavor; it is more of a culture change – a new way of gaining ground by freeing your analysts and decision makers to meet the future with sound knowledge and insight.
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